• Is Your Child Gifted?

    It’s not uncommon for individuals to have questions about what is or isn’t normal for a child. After all, many parents want to do what they can to ensure that their child grows up happy, healthy, and well-rounded. In particular, some common questions that parents have when it comes to their child regard what behaviors and developments are considered normal. If your child is enrolled in first grade, kindergarten, pre-k, or preschool in Pembroke Pines , and you’re wondering if his level of development is normal for his age, then there are some indications that you can watch for which may show that he is gifted.

    What qualifies as gifted varies depending on where you live and who you ask. However, some signs that can indicate that your child may be gifted include good communication skills, a love of reading, the ability to learn information quickly, and strong problem-solving skills. A child that is gifted may also embrace intellectual challenges, understand ideas easily, and have a high level of curiosity.

    Childhood Education in Pembroke Pines

  • Motor Skill Milestones in Pre-K

    Kids in pre-K go through an amazing number of transitions that always amaze parents. In particular, kids in this age group reach a number of important milestones with their motor skills. If your child is enrolled in pre-K in Pembroke Pines, keep an eye out for these exciting developmental changes.

    Both gross and fine motor skills take a leap in pre-K. In terms of gross motor skills, kids learn to control their running more precisely, including stopping and turning more gracefully. Kids at this age learn to hop on one foot, do somersaults, and bounce, catch, and throw a ball. Parents are also thrilled to discover that their kids can now brush their teeth, comb their hair, and dress themselves without help. Fine motor skill development in pre-K includes learning to print letters, cutting on a line, and using utensils appropriately. Copying shapes, like crosses and squares, also becomes easy.

    Motor Skills in Pre-K by Tanglewood Academy

  • Student Meets World: The Whys and Hows of Nonfiction for First-Graders

    Although first-grade readers are bound to love the fun, fictional stories that are written for their age group, they are also sure to be fascinated by the true stories about the world around them. Incorporating nonfiction into first-grade reading encourages curiosity and helps prepare students for the reading they will do later in their academic careers. Here is some insight into why nonfiction reading is important for your first-grader in Pembroke Pines and how you can encourage him or her to embrace it. First-Grade Reading Book in Tanglewood Academy

    Why should first-graders read nonfiction?

    Nonfiction is a fit for first grade students for a number of different reasons. Exposing first-grade readers to a range of different types of texts is part of teaching them to love reading, since it lets them finds the stories that appeal to them the most. Nonfiction reading also brings facts and ideas about the world around them to life, so they increase their knowledge and develop a natural curiosity about the world. When kids move through school, they will face increasing demands to read nonfiction texts in their classes. Getting them exciting about this kind of reading when they are young will make future homework sessions a lot easier.

    How can I get my first-grader excited about nonfiction?

    There are several things you can do to make your first-grader reach for nonfiction. First, talk to them about why nonfiction is important and how it can help them learn more about the people and places that are interesting to them. Discuss what nonfiction topics interest your child and go to the library together to pick out titles. If you’re planning a trip somewhere, such as a day at a museum or a vacation, pick out nonfiction books that teach kids about some of the exhibits or the places you’ll be visiting. By connecting nonfiction to your child’s world, he or she will get to experience the excitement of immersive learning.

  • Fun Games That Teach Self-Regulation

    One invaluable skill that kids learn in early childhood education is self-regulation. In the classroom, teachers use games to foster this area of child development for better classroom management and so that students get the skills they need to succeed in school as they progress through each grade. Your child’s early childhood education teacher in Pembroke Pines will be happy to discuss the activities he or she uses to teach self-regulation with you. These games are just a few of the fun ways teachers help kids learn the all-important skill of self-regulation and self-control. Tanglewood Academy Offer Fun Games That Teach Self-Regulation

    Red Light, Purple Light

    Many students are familiar with the game red light, green light, but changing the colors makes students adapt while practicing their color recognition. Start by assigning “go” and “stop” meanings to two different colors, and use construction paper in those colors to indicate when students should move and when they should stop. Once the children have automated their responses to those colors, change to two different colors and repeat the activity. This game forces students to concentrate and regulate how they respond to cues.

    Simon Says

    Simon Says is a classic game that offers many opportunities to practice self-regulation. To succeed, students must listen, concentrate, modify their movements, and follow directions. Giving students each a chance to be Simon further increases the chances to work on self-regulation.

    Think or Say

    Emotional self-regulation is also an important part of early childhood education. The Think or Say activity makes children think about how they are feeling and is especially ideal for helping kids through their tattling stages. Teachers can introduce many different scenarios and ask the class whether they should say what they are thinking or keep it to themselves. The scenarios can range from dealing with hurt feelings from a classmate to what to do if they see a classmate who is not following directions. Teachers can adapt the scenarios to make them relevant to things that are happening in the classroom.

  • Library Do’s and Don’ts for Kids

    Visiting the library is a fun way to encourage your kids to love to read. When your child is working on Kindergarten reading in Pembroke Pines , going to the library to find books to supplement what he or she is learning in the classroom is a perfect way to show your child the world of reading for pleasure.

    Help your kindergarten-age child get the most from his or her library experience by teaching the rules in this video before you go. The library is not the place for running or loud noises. Show your child how to treat books with respect and only handle them with clean hands. The library can become a favorite family destination and a good resource for supporting Kindergarten reading once your child learns the rules.

  • Raising a Young Scientist

    There are many ways to encourage your child to enjoy science and learning about the world around her. Speak with her Pembroke Pines pre-kindergarten teachers about different educational tactics, and speak with your child about different ways she would like to learn. Perform experiments with each other and have fun researching different topics. Read on for more information about how to raise a young scientist. Pre-Kindergarten Encourage Curiosity

    Encourage Curiosity

    Children are naturally curious and always have questions about how the world works. This natural curiosity is a great gift for your child, so encourage it however and whenever you can. Answer your child’s questions and engage in a dialogue to begin developing her critical thinking skills. If you do not know the answer to a question, then take the opportunity to research together. Ask her pre-k teacher, check out library books, and search websites on the internet. This experience will show your child the value of research and learning.

    Speak with Eloquence

    Many people speak down to children, because they believe children will not or should not understand an adult conversation. However, children are much smarter than some adults give them credit for, and they can understand complicated situations in much simpler terms. You can help your child foster her communication skills early by speaking to her with eloquence. Treat her like an equal and do not shy away from large words or complicated terms.

    Engage in Experiments

    There are so many science experiments that can be done at home or in your child’s pre-kindergarten class. These activities are fun and engaging, and you can create a dialogue about how different scientific elements work. For example, you can grab a variety of items and see which ones will float or sink in a bucket of water. Have your child guess which object will float or sink and have her place each one in the water. This can be a wet and silly experiment that will also teach your child more about water and how it reacts to everyday objects.

  • Getting Back to Nature in Childhood 

    Whether through an after school program in Pembroke Pines , time spent in the backyard, or activities that you arrange for your family, allowing your child to enjoy unstructured play outdoors offers many benefits. Watch this video to learn about the importance of getting back to nature in childhood.

    Today, many children are spending less time outside than ever, which may have an impact on their development. For example, executive functions like critical thinking, problem-solving, and organizing are best-developed in outdoor, unstructured play environments. Also, researchers know that the brains of children are developed in a more critical way when exposed to an outdoor setting. Finally, when outside and playing with peers, children tend to utilize critical social skills and competencies that they may not in an indoor, structured play environment.

  • Spotlight on Social and Emotional Development in Pre-K Students

    Your rising pre-kindergartener will make some important strides this upcoming school year. Pre-kindergarten programs in Pembroke Pines lay a foundation for both academic success and socio-emotional growth. No two kids progress at the same rate, but in general, you can expect your four-or five-year-old pre-k student to exhibit greater independence in social situations. At the same time, your child may want to please his or her friends and fit in with them.

    Pre-k students usually separate more easily from parents, as they grow closer to their teachers and other trusted adults. They may also take the initiative in social situations, such as by suggesting a fun activity, engaging in complex pretend play, and offering to share with a friend. As your child acquires greater mastery with academic skills and self-care abilities, his or her self-esteem will flourish. You’ll start to notice your child using more complex language to express feelings. Although your child will develop better coping skills, he or she will still seek adult guidance when emotions become overwhelming.

    Pre-Kindergarten Programs in Pembroke Pines

  • Tips for Kindergarten Parents

    Even if your child has attended structured early childhood education programs, the kindergarten year is an exciting milestone, as it’s considered the first year of formal schooling. Your child’s education in Pembroke Pines encompasses important academic skills like math and literacy, but it also involves personal growth and socio-emotional development. Encourage your child to reach for the stars, but have reasonable expectations and give your son or daughter the freedom to simply enjoy childhood. Girl Attending Kindergarten in Pembroke Pines

    Nurture your child’s independence.

    When your son or daughter reaches kindergarten age, he or she will start displaying greater independence. Encourage this by teaching important self-care skills. Teach your child how to button up clothes, tie shoes, and wash hands. Position the milk jug and snacks on a lower shelf in the fridge, and let your child serve him-or herself. Spills are to be expected, as your child is still learning self-care skills.

    Read every day.

    Reading with your child every day is one of the most impactful ways to support your child’s education. It lets your son or daughter naturally absorb the rhythm and structure of sentences, and simply get absorbed in the magical world of stories. Reading with your child nurtures the close bond you share with him or her. It sparks your child’s imagination and entices his or her curiosity.

    Create a musical home.

    Every child has artistic tendencies, and nurturing them supports your child’s self-esteem and sense of wonder. Music also encourages a strong vocabulary, better memory, and dynamic social skills. Sing with your child in the car, or start a band in the kitchen by tapping on overturned pots and drinking glasses. Talent is not important, but enthusiasm is.

    Talk often.

    When your child was an infant, you probably learned that talking to him or her frequently supported healthy development. During the kindergarten age, this fact still holds true. Encourage your child’s oral language skills by actively listening to him or her, asking open-ended questions, and letting your child know that what he or she says is important to you.

  • Answering Common Questions About Pre-Kindergarten Programs

    Pre-kindergarten programs are offered to children in the year before they enter kindergarten. Children will be around four years old, which is when they are beginning to develop a better understanding of the world around them. Pre-kindergarten programs in Pembroke Pines can foster their understanding and provide the necessary academic and social education to help children succeed. Let’s take a look at the answers to some common questions about pre-kindergarten programs. Questions Answers About Pre-Kindergarten Programs

    Do they provide academic value?

    Pre-kindergarten programs are meant as a stepping stone into kindergarten education. These programs help children develop the much-needed foundations of kindergarten math and reading skills. Children in pre-kindergarten programs will have the opportunity to learn pre-math and pre-reading skills that will also encourage them to take an active role in the world around them.

    Do they provide active play?

    Active play is essential for growing children, because it encourages the development of gross and fine motor skills. Gross motor skills include larger movement skills, such as throwing a ball or performing somersaults. Fine motor skills include smaller movements needed for future schooling, such as holding a pencil, cutting with scissors, and copying basic shapes. Pre-kindergarten programs will feature a lot of active play to encourage these skills.

    Do they provide social interaction?

    Pre-kindergarten is a great place for children to develop and continue developing their social skills. Pre-kindergarten programs provide many opportunities to learn teamwork, communication, and social expression. This is a critical time in children’s social development, because it’s when children begin to cement their understanding of right and wrong and how to respond to other kids and adults.

    Are they required education?

    Pre-kindergarten programs are typically voluntary, and they may be classified as voluntary pre-kindergarten, or VPK. Though voluntary, VPK is an important program for children entering kindergarten. New education standards have made kindergarten curriculum more intense, and children must be fully prepared before entering their kindergarten class. Pre-kindergarten programs offer children the academic education, social interaction, and the foundational skills they will need to succeed in kindergarten and beyond.